All of it you can use in your playing. Listed above are the mode names with their corresponding major scale degrees. It is really quite simple if you think about it. Even though the scale modes are using the notes of the “C” Ionian Scale (C Major Scale) for our examples on this menu page – each scale mode will have its own distinctive sound to it. If you’ve learned the various modes by memorizing the intervals between each scale degree, that’s great! All the subjects covered on this menu page are much more intense than what is covered here. Ionian starts on the first degree of a major scale, Dorian starts on the second degree of a major scale, and so on. Because bass players play notes, knowing which notes to play over which chords, makes you very powerful. Each mode uses the same notes of the “Ionian” scale, but starts at a different position. What does all this have to do with you and your bass playing? Let’s take a look at this not-so-confusing musical concept. This will also sign you up to my weekly newsletter where you will get free bass tips, lessons and advice. You can always memorize modes by memorizing the intervals between each note of the scale, like we do with the major scale (Whole Whole Half Whole Whole Whole Half). Know the mode you’re playing in, and you’re well on your way to providing great bass lines for any song. I will start with the “C” Major scale since there are no sharps and flats in this scale (this will make it easier to explain all this). Your email address is safe with me. The basic formula that is used is  “1 – 3 – 5” for building chords (there are more formulas, but for these examples we will only be using a couple). Or you can think of it as starting with the same basic cooking recipe but adding different flavors (different sounds) to change it slightly. After logging in you can close it and return to this page. The small roman numerals (ii, iii, vi, and vii) refer to “minor” scales / chords, and the capital roman numerals (I, IV, and V) refer to “Major” or “Dominant” type scales / chords. So go ahead, pick up your bass and see what happens when you play a F-sharp Phrygian lick over a D major 7th chord. Know the mode you’re playing in, and you’re well on your way to providing great bass lines for any song. If you get any value from my lessons and would like to help keep this site running and the weekly lessons flowing, click the button below for a small donation. Again, using the formula 1 – 3 – 5 you get the D – F – A notes. E Dorian Scale. (Mode is … You can always memorize modes by memorizing the intervals between each note of the scale, like we do with the major scale (Whole Whole Half Whole Whole Whole Half). Now ask yourself this simple question: “F is the fifth degree of what major scale?” A perfect fifth below F is B-flat, so you would apply the B-flat major key signature. These 3 notes make up the “C Major” chord. I don't share your details with any other party and won't crowd your inbox. Bass Scales and Modes – How Scales are built…. It’s actually quite simple, using the formula 1 – 3 – 5 you get the C – E – G notes. Here’s the full list in the key of C major: I also encourage you to practice each mode using the same root note. Keep in mind that bass guitarists go to music schools or study in college for years to master scale modes and all this chord building theory stuff. The chart below will give you a better look at how the notes of a “C” major scale are numbered and named (the Greek names for the modes and the alternates)…. A few years ago I released 2 in-depth videos on the modes for bass […] All in all, there are seven total modes of the C Major scale, and in this article we are going to talk about the second mode. Let’s break this down into two parts: the given pitch, aka your starting note (F) and the mode (Mixolydian, fifth degree). There are 7 notes in the “C” Major scale they are C-D-E-F-G-A-B (no sharps or flats). An F Mixolydian scale is an F scale, but rather than using the key signature for F major (one flat), you’re going to apply the key signature for B-flat major (two flats). Please log in again. Even if you never use the information below, you should still read it. Yes, bass players need to know how chords are built – Why? Each region had different modes they based their music off of – hence the funky names. Modes are absolutely huge for your creativity as a bass player. Half-steps are one fret away (notes that are right next to each other), and Whole-steps are two frets away (notes that have one fret between them). It’s actually quite simple if you think about it. Why? Because bass players play notes, knowing which notes to play over which chords, makes you very powerful. Solo scales: A solo scale is exactly what it sounds like — a scale you play when you’re soloing or the featured player in a band.