4, fourth movement, String Quintet Op. 1, second movement, String Quintet Op. Boccherini's style is characterized by Rococo charm, lightness, and optimism, and exhibits much melodic and rhythmic invention, coupled with frequent influences from the guitar tradition of his adopted country, Spain. 1, third movement, String Quintet Op. Boccherini was born in Lucca, Italy, into a musical family. [7] Luigi received his first music lessons at age five by his father, who taught him cello, and then continued his studies at age nine with Abbé Vanucci, music director of a local cathedral, at San Martino. 30 No. 25 Dec 1583 – 5 June 1625, Recently Added Sheet Music: 20 November 2020, Richard Genée: 17 Feb 1823 – 15 June 1895, Recently Added Sheet Music – 13 November 2020, Giovanni Gabrieli: c1554/1557 – 12 Aug 1612, Girolamo Frescobaldi: Sept 1583 – 1 March 1643, www.facebook.com/ClassicFM/videos/959726784551737/. 2, second and last movement, String Quintet Op. From the description of Concerto for violoncello in E flat / Luigi Boccherini. 1, second movement, String Quintet Op. [8] In 1757 Luigi Boccherini and his father both went to Vienna, where the court employed them as musicians in the Burgtheater. There he flourished under royal patronage, until one day when the King expressed his disapproval at a passage in a new trio, and ordered Boccherini to change it. 11, No. On his second journey to Vienna (1760), Boccherini, at 17, made his debut as a composer with his Six Trios for Two Violins and Cello, G 77–82. The king’s brother, the infante Don Luis, conferred on him a yearly endowment of 30,000 reals as a cellist and composer. At the age of five Luigi’s father started teaching him the cello. 4, second movement, String Quintet Op. He wrote a large amount of chamber music, including over one hundred string quintets for two violins, viola and two cellos (a type which he pioneered, in contrast with the then common scoring for two violins, two violas and one cello), a dozen guitar quintets, not all of which have survived, nearly a hundred string quartets, and a number of string trios and sonatas (including at least 19 for the cello). [8] When his son reached thirteen, Leopoldo Boccherini sent him to study in Rome with Giovanni Battista Costanzi. Boccherini's works have been gaining more recognition since the late 20th century, in print, record, and concert hall. His biographer Elisabeth LeGuin noted among his musical qualities "an astonishing repetitiveness, an affection for extended passages with fascinating textures, but virtually no melodic line, an obsession with soft dynamics, a unique ear for sonority, and an unusually rich palette of introverted and mournful affects". Boccherini composed several guitar quintets including the "Fandango" which was influenced by Spanish music. 30 No. Boccherini is sometimes referred to as the 'wife of Haydn', because much of his chamber music closely resembles the Austrian master's. Lucca. Boccherini married Joaquina Porreti in 1787. 2, third movement, String Quintet Op. His orchestral music includes around 30 symphonies and 12 virtuoso cello concertos. [citation needed] He was buried in the Pontifical Basilica of St. Michael until 1927, when Benito Mussolini repatriated his remains to the Church of San Francesco of his native Lucca. Maria Santa Biccherini (born Prosperi), Leopold Biccherini, Maria Del Pilar Joaquina Boccherini (born Porreti), Mrs Luigi Boccherini, Clementina Boccherini (born Pelicho), Boccherini, Boccherini, Giovan Gastone Boccherini, Cause of death: Tuberculosis - May 28 1805 - Madrid, Madrid, Community of Madrid, Madrid, Spain, Via Fillungo, Lucca, Lucca, Toscana, Italy, Great Composers of the Old Schools of Classical Music (XI - XIX Centuries), Birth of Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini Prosperi, Death of Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini Prosperi, Burial of Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini Prosperi, Birth of María Teresa Boccherini Prosperi, Italian classical era composer and cellist. He wrote a large amount of chamber music, including over one hundred string quintets for two violins, viola and two cellos (a type which he pioneered, in contrast with the then common scoring for two violins, two violas and one cello), a dozen guitar quintets, not all of which have survived, nearly a hundred string quartets, and a number of string trios and sonatas (including at least 19 for the cello). At thirteen he was sent to Rome, while a journey to Milan to visit Sammartini. He is most widely known for one particular minuet from his String Quintet in E, Op. In 1761 Boccherini went to Madrid, entering in 1770 the employ of Infante Luis Antonio of Spain (1727–1785), younger brother of King Charles III of Spain. Like Vivaldi in relation to Bach, Boccherini is found wanting for the very qualities that established his fame as a composer: melodic fecundity, an emphasis on virtuosity (especially with respect to his own instrument, the cello), fairly undemanding forms, and a lack of the kind of thematic development that had become a hallmark of German music. He composed several guitar quintets, including the "Fandango", which was influenced by Spanish music. 11, No. 1, third movement, String Quintet Op. Boccherini was born into a musical family in Lucca, Italy in 1743. 6, G324), became popular through its use in films such as Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World. Geni requires JavaScript! Please select which sections you would like to print: Corrections? Luigi Boccherini was an Italian composer and cellist. In 1798 the new king of Prussia refused to extend Boccherini’s pension, the duchess of Osuna (another important source of income) moved to Paris, and Boccherini’s financial distress was aggravated by poor health. 3, second and last movement, String Quintet Op. The Galeazzi collection, 1806-1898 (inclusive). Later patrons included the French ambassador to Spain, Lucien Bonaparte (1775–1840), as well as King Friedrich Wilhelm II of Prussia (1744–1797), himself an amateur cellist, flautist, and avid supporter of the arts. 10 No. Enter a grandparent's name. 30 No. In Rome Boccherini was influenced by the polyphonic tradition (i.e., music with two or more interweaving melodic parts) stemming from the works of Giovanni da Palestrina and from the instrumental music of Arcangelo Corelli. The latter work was long known in the heavily altered version by German cellist and prolific arranger Friedrich Grützmacher, but has recently been restored to its original version. Bizet created approximately five hundred works which included symphonies, concerti and sacred music. 27 No. In 1761 Boccherini went to Madrid, where he was employed by Infante Luis Antonio of Spain, younger brother of King Charles III. The quintets were to be played by a court quartet made up of the Font family, father and three sons, plus Boccherini himself. Boccherini's works have been catalogued by the French musicologist Yves Gérard (1932-2020) in the Gérard catalog, published in London (1969), hence the "G" numbers applied to his output. His family were musical – his father a cellist and double bass player, and his uncle a poet and dancer who wrote libretto’s for Joseph Haydn and Antonio Salieri. In 1757 they both went to Vienna where they were employed by the court as musicians in the Burgtheater. Just one grandparent can lead you to many Boccherini put together the first public string quartet performance, with an extraordinary string quartet made up of outstanding Tuscan virtuosos, including himself, Pietro Nardini, Nardini’s pupil Filippo Manfredi, and Giuseppe Cambini. Much of Boccherini's chamber music follows models established by Joseph Haydn; however, Boccherini is often credited with improving Haydn's model of the string quartet by bringing the cello to prominence, whereas Haydn had frequently relegated it to an accompaniment role. 18 No. In 1785, when both Clementina and the infante died, the king granted him a pension of 12,000 reals, after which he was free to accept the patronage of (among others) Frederick William II of Prussia, who was an amateur cellist and well acquainted with Boccherini’s music.