Immature Townsend's Solitaire high up in the Wasatch Mountains – Nikon D500, f7.1, 1/800, ISO 500, +0.3 EV, Nikkor 500mm VR with 1.4x TC, natural light My recent solo trips to the West Desert have refreshed me and given me a sense of peace plus I've enjoyed the Its plumage is cool gray overall, with slightly lighter underparts. It is especially fond of nesting along cut banks. The Townsend's Solitaire requires a combination of steep banks for nest sites, open forests where it catches aerial prey, and tall trees to perch on. The Townsend’s Solitaire is common in much of the West and populations remained stable between 1968 and 2015, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey. Sleek songbird, a bit smaller than robin and much slimmer. Though they're thrushes, they perch upright atop trees and shrubs to advertise their territories all year long, and can easily be mistaken for flycatchers. Townsend's Solitaire (Myadestes townsendi) bird sounds on dibird.com. If you live in an area of the West where juniper trees grow, try adding a couple to your yard to entice a Townsend Solitaire to visit during the winter. Shawn McCready. Loves juniper. The Cornell Lab will send you updates about birds, birding, and opportunities to help bird conservation. Unlike most thrushes, Townsend’s Solitaires fly out and back from a perch to capture food, similar to how flycatchers behave. It resembles a mockingbird in shape and color, but is smaller. Favorites. The Townsend's Solitaires (Myadestes townsendi) are also known as Townsend's Flycatchers, Townsend's Thrushes or Townsend's Ptilogonys.. Be on the lookout for a gray bird that quickly darts out of the bank as you walk by (and if you do flush a bird, don't stick around too long and allow the bird to return to its nest). Perching birds show buffy wing-patches. Thrushes and Allies(Order: Passeriformes, Family:Turdidae). Violent fights may break out in defense of the winter territory, because owners of large, berry-rich territories survive the winter at higher rates than solitaires on small territories with few berries. In winter they switch from eating primarily insects to eating fruit, particularly juniper berries. Overall plain medium-gray with short bill, rather long tail, white eyering, and buff patches in wings. The Townsend’s Solitaire is in the thrush family, which includes species such as Western Bluebird and American Robin. Note that various unidentified birds and a Pine Squirrel can be heard in the background. The Townsend’s Solitaire is the only solitaire species in the continental United States, but 7 other species of solitaire (genus. Found at higher elevations in the breeding season. Townsend's Solitaire bird photo call and song/ Myadestes townsendi (Ptiliogonys [sic] townsendi) Note upright posture and white eyering. The Townsend’s Solitaire is an elegant, wide-eyed songbird of western-mountain forests. Males and females look alike, and both have white eye-rings and dark wingtips accented with cream. Though they're thrushes, they perch upright atop trees and shrubs to advertise their territories all year long, and can easily be mistaken for flycatchers. It has a crisp, thin eye-ring, a short bill, and black legs. These grey songbirds are best known for their melodious, flute-like vocalizations. Other chats, thrushes and mockingbirds. Townsend's Solitaire by Ryan Sanderson | Macaulay Library. California thrasher. Get Instant ID help for 650+ North American birds. The Townsend's Solitaire is the only solitaire native to America north of Mexico. Townsend's Solitaire (Myadestes townsendi) bird sounds on dibird.com. One study suggested they would need to eat between 42,000 and 84,000 juniper berries to survive the winter. Townsend’s Solitaires are fairly inconspicuous birds that often sit motionless, but their sweet jumbling song and tendency to sing throughout the year, is often the best way to track them down. Song is complex; call is a single, ringing, bell-like note. The name of this bird commemorates the ornithologist John Kirk Townsend. Its wings have black flight feathers and an intricate, yellowish-brown pattern. Perhaps the easiest time to see them is during winter, when these birds are common around junipers loaded with berries. Credit / Author: J. Bendire's thrasher. If you ever thought that you liked berries, check out a Townsend's Solitaire's appetite. Drops into lowlands in the winter. Look for The Townsend’s solitaire is a relatively small thrush. Search. Brown thrasher. They feed largely or even exclusively on the juniper's ripe, fleshy berries for the entire nonbreeding season. In flight, buffy wing-stripes are evident. Listen to Townsend's solitaire on bird-sounds.net - a comprehensive collection of North American bird songs and bird calls. Extends its range in winter by moving to lower elevations in the West, and moving eastward. Home. It has a long tail with white streaks on the outer edges. Bicknell's thrush. These long-tailed, short-billed thrushes occur naturally in western North America where they inhabit woody mountainous areas. Partners in Flight estimates the global breeding population at 1 million individuals, with 80% spending some part of the year in the U.S., 39% in Canada, and 13% in Mexico. During the winter, the male and female are both strongly territorial, defending patches of juniper trees against other solitaires and other birds. Their sweet jumbling song gives them away and enlivens their evergreen forest and juniper woodland homes. The Townsend’s Solitaire is an elegant, wide-eyed songbird of western-mountain forests. The oldest recorded Townsend's Solitaire was at least 5 years old when it was recaptured and rereleased during banding operations in California. 0:00 / Townsend's solitaire (song) song. They give this tew call … Learn more about how to create bird-friendly backyards at Habitat Network. Townsend's solitaire. Three years later, John James Audubon honored Townsend by naming the bird after him. While severe, the losses may turn out to be less than predicted, because the model over-predicts the occurrence of the Townsend’s Solitaire at the present time, placing it well to the east of where it actually occurs. Song: Townsend's Solitaire song, also Townsend's Solitaire call note. Job. Their drab gray plumage gets a lift from subtly beautiful buffy wing patches and a white eyering. Now that is a lot of berries. Their drab gray plumage gets a lift from subtly beautiful buffy wing patches and a white eyering. A - Z. App. Townsend’s Solitaires have 4 types of calls. John Kirk Townsend collected the first Townsend’s Solitaire in 1835 along the lower Willamette River in Oregon. song. Breeding in Middle America, North America: w Canada to c Mexico; can be seen in 3 countries.